The Backcountry Brides Collection: Across Three Autumns

Backcountry Brides: Travel into Colonial America where nine women seek love, but they each know a future husband requires the necessary skills to survive in the backcountry. Living in areas exposed to nature’s ferocity, prone to Indian attack, and cut off from regular supplies, can hearts overcome the dangers to find lasting love?

Across Three Autumns by Denise Weimer: Fighting Loyalists and Indians, Jenny White settles for strength over love . . .until Scottish scout Caylan McIntosh leads her family on a harrowing exodus out of Georgia’s Revolutionary War “Hornet’s Nest.”

Jenny White is inspired by the red-haired Revolutionary War heroine Nancy Hart!

  • "Jenny is a magnificent goddess among women." - Brutally Honest Reviews
  • “I loved this story of Caylan and Jenny! A knot of heart-pumping excitement with nail-biting anticipation.” – Rejina Fujitani
  • “This is a wonderful story blending folklore, Georgia history, and romance.” - NinerFan
  • Across Three Autumns by Denise Weimer is a sure fire winner. Jenny White leaps from the pages into your heart." - Lucy Reynolds
  • "A heart jumpin' blood flowin' love flowin' story!" - Amazon reviewer

The Real "Jenny White" From Across Three Autumns: Nancy Hart

This May, Backcountry Brides released with Barbour Publishing! I'm so excited to have my novella, Across Three Autumns, included in this beautiful collection. The tale centers on the Battle of Kettle Creek, while my protagonist Jenny White is inspired by Revolutionary War heroine, Nancy Hart. Jenny is not Nancy, but I did borrow from Nancy's appearance and exploits to create a strong, atypical heroine who secretly struggles with insecurity.

 

“On the frontier, strength is beauty and courage is life.”


Nancy Ann Morgan Hart is believed by most to have been born in North Carolina’s Yadkin River Valley in the mid-1730s and to have moved to the Broad River (Elbert County, Georgia) in the early 1770s. With her husband Benjamin, who became a lieutenant under Col. Elijah Clark, she had six sons and two daughters. Their one-room, pine cabin—its walls covered by antler hunting trophies and peppered by holes in the chinking to defend against Indians—rested in a crest of a hill overlooking what became known as Wahatche Creek, embraced by an extensive apple orchard and herb garden Nancy used in her medicinal cures.

 

But Nancy was not the expected meek, traditional Colonial woman. Beauty and grace passed six-foot-tall Nancy right on by. Pipe-smoking, crossed-eyed, and pock-marked, Nancy was a crack shot the Indians called “Wahatche” or “War Woman,” and named her creek after her. Possessing no patience for weak men, she was said to be “a honey of a patriot but a devil of a wife.”

 

Hart became the stuff of Georgia legends during the Revolutionary War. Refusing to leave the “Hornet’s Nest” when other civilians fled, Nancy provided a prime example of using what she had in the interest

of a cause. During the British occupation of Augusta when Clark needed information on enemy plans, she was said to have dressed as a man and pretended to be “addle-pated” to gain confidences in the British camp. On another occasion, while making soap over the fire, one of her children noticed an eye peeking in the cabin chinking. Nancy threw lye into the crevice and went outside to hog tie and take the prisoner to local militia.

 

Another time, six British soldiers, irritated with Nancy, who dressed as a sick woman and misdirected them in their pursuit of a rebel, shot her last turkey and insisted she cook it for them. Nancy broke out the corn liquor and sent her daughter Sukey to the swamp ostensibly to get water but really to blow a conch shell to summon her father and neighbors working in a far field. Meanwhile, Nancy passed the soldiers’ stacked weapons through a chink in the wall. She got caught on the third. Nancy leveled the musket she held and warned the men she’d shoot any who advanced. One made that mistake and was rapidly dispatched. The others froze, convinced, and also quite confused by Nancy’s roving eye as to who her next target might be. She held the others at bay until help arrived, then insisted shooting was too good for the interlopers. Legend says the settlers hung the party of British. In 1912, a railroad grading crew uncovered six skeletons under three feet of Hart dirt, giving credence to this particular story.

 

Nancy’s later days ended well. Gov. George Gilmer’s mother testified late in life that Nancy “went to the house of worship in search of relief.” Cutting the fastening off the door of the Methodist meeting house, Nancy barged in and stated she’d heard how the wicked might work out their salvation. “She … became a shouting Christian, [and] fought the devil as manfully as she had fought the Tories.”

Holly, Ivy & Intrigue: A Holiday Intruder

Holly, Ivy & Intrigue is a collection of three novellas, suspense from Joanie Bruce and Alexa Verde, and cozy mystery from Denise Weimer. All include a satisfying dose of romance set during the holiday season!

A Holiday Intruder
:
Kelsey Jordan prefers upcycling junk and refinishing antiques for her store in a Georgia mountains town to being the center of attention. When a robbery and an unknown benefactor shove her in the middle of a decades-old mystery, and a real estate developer and a former baseball star compete for her attention, Kelsey isn't sure who to trust.

Amazon only, Kindle or print: Order Holly, Ivy & Intrigue

Redeeming Grace: A Hills of Habersham Novella

Available Kindle only: Denise's first novella, Redeeming Grace


Order Redeeming Grace for Kindle


Searching for something she cannot define and breaking under the stress as a rising star at The Metropolitan Opera, Grace Galveston travels to Tallulah Falls, Georgia, for a reprieve. In the summer of 1886, Tallulah Gorge, with its multiple waterfalls, spectacular mountain scenery, and lavish resort hotels, was already known as “The Niagara of the South.” Even amid the crowds and excitement surrounding the attempt of an aerialist to cross the chasm on a high wire, Grace hopes to find peace. Unexpectedly, though, the trip sheds light on the secret pain in her heart. Can the blessing of friendship and the possibility of love with a local minister guide her toward healing? Or will their differences and the call of her life back in New York mean even greater heartbreak?


"The best book ever!" - Courageous Words Blog


"Like a visit to ... the post-Civil War South. This novella provided both entertainment and thought-provoking discussion about spiritual matters. Loved reading it - and sad when I finished it." - author Elaine Marie Cooper

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